"Thank God for film archivist Dennis Nyback. If not for his encyclopedic knowledge of rare films and his tenacity for acquiring them, we would never have the privilege to view some astounding works of cinema." Kim Morgan


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Vaudeville Deluxe

http://library.sps.edu/06archives/sesquicentennial/Exhibit1/images/71Vaudeville.jpg

Vaudeville was an American art form that flourished on stages throughout the United States and Canada, with excursions into foreign lands, in the latter part of the 19th Century and the much of the first half of the 20th.  It consisted of varied unrelated acts on a common bill.  Those acts could range from singers, dancers and comedians; to animal acts, jugglers, and sword swallowers, with many, many others in between.  “Big Time” Vaudeville could be seen in theaters that seated thousands.  It could also be seen on bills in smaller and  smaller venues down to  ” Opera Houses” and Granges in little towns dotting the country. There has a been a resurgence of interest in Vaudeville, or what is now called NeoVaudeville, by young performers who think there is more to performing than singing on American Idol.  This film program consists of films from 1925 to 1940.  The earliest is a sound test film featuring Gus Visser and his Singing Duck.  The newest is Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers from the 1941 film Hellzapoppin.  In between are rope skippers, roller skaters, contortionists, Hawaiian musicans, hillbillies, acrobats, CHAZ CHASE who eats anything,  W. C. Fields‘ juggling act, and of course, singers, dancers and comedians.  Trav S D. , performer, and author of  No Applause–Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous felt bereft that the thousands who would have benefited from it hadn’t shown up for the screening he arranged in New York City. Stephen Parr of Oddball Film called it the very best of all of my shows. Napoleon once commented that people like to be astounded.  Vaudeville Deluxe will delight and astound you!

The Program:

Gus Visser and His Singing Duck Ma, She’s Making Eyes at Me (1925)

J. Harold Murray Singing The Ranger Song (1928)

Two College Boys Duke Atterbury and Ken Gillum (c1929)

Raquel Meller sings   Flor Del Mar (1928)

W. C. Fields Juggles Excerpt from The Old Fashioned Way (1934)

Vitaphone Frolics (1937)

Stanley Brothers Eccentric Acrobatic Dancing

Jack and Loretta Clemens Guitarist and Pianist Singing Duo

Zeb Carver and His Cousins Hillbilly Act

The L.I.M.E Trio – The Golliwog Undescribable

That Goes Double (1933)

Russ Columbo Famous Doomed Crooner

Roy Smeck Plays the Hell out of Ukulele

The Three Cossacks Amazing Roller-skating

Bernice and Emily Jaw Dropping Staircase Action

Broadway Nights and Hollywood Days (c1935)

Ed Sullivan

Eddie Cantor

Georgie Jessel

Jack Benny

Smash Your Baggage (1933)

Entertainers from Small’s Paradise All Need to Seen to Be Appreciated

The Man who Tap Dances and Skips Rope on his Knees!

Elmer Snowden Harlem Banjo Player

Dickie Wells Jazz Trombone

Roy Eldridge “Little Jazz” Himself

Rubberlegs Williams Eceentric Dancer

Vitaphone Gambols (1937)

A.B.C. Trio Ethnic String Band with Thumb Piano

Masters and Rollins Eccentric Comic Dance

Chaz Chase The Man Who Eats Anything

Elaine Dowling and Tip Top Girls Rope Jumping!

The All-Colored Vaudeville Show (1935)

Eunice Wilson and the Five Racketeers Great Singing with Harlem String Band

The Three Whippets Unbelievable Acrobats

Adalaide Hall accompanied by pianist Joe Turner A Wonderful Singer

The Nicholas Brothers The Greatest Dancers Ever

Eddie Peabody and His College Chums (1929)

Eddie Peabody – The Jimi Hendrix of the Banjo

Hal Kemp’s Ochestra – A Wonderful Twenties Band